Challenge Yourself: You Don’t Know What You Can Achieve

It’s the first Wednesday of the Month which means it’s officially Insecure Writers Support Group Day. Thank you, Alex J Cavanaugh, and thank you our Rocking co-hosts for the March 7  posting of the IWSG: Mary Aalgaard, Bish Denham, Jennifer Hawes, Diane Burton, and Gwen Gardner.

Several weeks ago I found this compilation of “11 Quotes for facing your fears” on www.Dictionary.com. They are still on the website as of this morning. There are some good quotes and I  wrote a few of them down and have them hanging beside my computer. I like to read them from time to time. One of my favorites is:

“Until you cross the bridge of your insecurities, you can’t begin to explore your possibilities.” – Tim Fargo.

Fargo has written some business books which I’m fairly sure I will never purchase or read. I do love this quote and little things like that can inspire me when I begin to feel like throwing all my writing out of the window like Harper Lee did with her manuscript for “To Kill a Mocking Bird” except without the snow. While I was browsing through the quotes, I  recognized many of the names to which the quotes were attributed. There was another quote I want to share.

“Write what disturbs you, what you fear, what you have not been willing to speak about. Be willing to be split open.”—Natalie Goldberg

The quote and the name sounded familiar and I realized she is the author of “Writing Down the Bone: Freeing the Writer Within.” This book was published in 1986 and I read it when I was writing my first novel and really enjoyed it.

I looked at the quote and thought that was a tall order. I use my emotional experiences as a source to draw on when writing fiction. Several days later I found myself writing a poem about my very deepest pain. I’m not a poet. I haven’t written a poem, or rather I haven’t tried to write a poem since I was in junior high. That was a long time ago. I think there were still dinosaurs roaming the Earth at that time.

I poured so much of myself and my pain into that poem, but I used a lot of symbolism. I still can’t believe I did this, but I entered the poem in a poetry contest. The only person who came close to understanding what the poem was about was the person judging the contest.

It wasn’t a free verse poem but it didn’t really follow any of the standard forms of metered quatrains. The judge wrote that she could feel all the emotion in my poem.

I won third place.

I crossed the bridge and I explored my possibilities. I also feel like I allowed myself to be split open. I exposed myself even though it was in an allusive manner.

I cried a bucket of tears. I crossed another bridge. I achieved exploring another possibility.

 

If you would like to read more blog posts from the IWSG, you can find links to their posts at the bottom of the page after clicking this link.

Insecure Writers Support Group